MARCH MEETING ROUNDUP

MARCH MEETING ROUNDUP


By Mary J. Schirmer

At the March 2015 MCA meeting, hosted by Patrick Barlow of Barlow Productions, experts on costumes and props took time from their busy schedules to offer insights on providing these services for stage and film productions. These panelists, noted below, have worked on major theatrical and film productions in Missouri and elsewhere, including the George Clooney-starrer UP IN THE AIR filmed in St. Louis, the Ben Affleck vehicle GONE GIRL filmed in Cape Girardeau, and the recent MARSHALL THE MIRACLE DOG filmed in St. Louis starring Lauren Holly and St. Louis native-gone-Hollywood Bill Chott.

The most successful props and costume crew members are able to think on their feet and improvise to solve unforeseen problems. Even so, the more notice a production can give them, the better.

Like many other professions, the best way to learn is to jump into the trenches.

Their motto: “Be Prepared for Anything.”

Props

Property masters haunt resale and antique shops, props warehouses, college theater departments, and the basements and attics of family and friends.

They’re trying to build a look with accessories and props. The more comfortable the actor is, the better the performance will be.

For long shoots, the props masters might live onsite to be available for last-minute needs and to duplicate items that “walked away” or broke. In fact, on big budget movies, the crew keeps duplicate props along with a catalog of these items.

For both props and costumes, items that would have to appear perfect in a camera close-up don’t have to be in immaculate condition on stage. The 10-foot rule for stage productions says that the audience will be at least 10 feet away, so you might get away with a quick fix with duct tape or with nicked furniture.

If the script calls for weapons, even fake weapons, check regulations before putting these items into actors’ hands.

Costumes

A costume often begins as a drawing or photo of what the client wants. The costumer works to locate or sew the costumes, as opposed to the wardrobe crew who work with the actors on set.

If you’re the actor, tell the costumer if you have allergies — for example, to wool — or if you perspire a lot. Kindly wear underwear to a fitting. Tell the costumer if you’ve lost or gained weight since your measurements were reported. Sometimes actresses have a baby between the time they’re measured and production begins.

Also, if you have to hide props in your costume, such as a weapon, tell the costumer so appropriate adjustments in fabric seams can be made.

If you’re the costumer, take your “tools” to the set. You might have to sew on a button that pops off the lead actor’s trousers — while he’s wearing them. You might have to “fix” fabric folds with your all-purpose knife while an actress is suspended from rigging.

The costume defines the character, not only for the audience but also for the actor. Costume colors, fabrics, and accessories often change as a story progresses.

Panelists were:

Sandi Blair, costume (unable to attend) robert schmidt costumes

Kathleen Gratz, costume kathleengratz@yahoo.com

Sheila Lenkman, costume http://www.repstl.org/costume_rentals/

Bruce Mai, costume http://www.casamai.com/slcg/index.html

Megan Power, costume dokidokidesigns@gmail.com

Tim Stephens, props www.artmonkeystudios.com

Jim Tudor, props www.ZekeFilm.org

Cathy Wilke, costume (unable to attend) heyetiki@yahoo.com

Clark Woodman, props clarkwoodman@hotmail.com

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MCA Meeting Sept 24, 2014

Think about Doin’ It on the Cheap!?
Micro-Budget, Low Budget, and Beyond

WHAT:  Learn tips and tricks from Producers Dan Steadman, Vanessa Roman, and Srikant Chellappa who have made films with a variety of budgets.

WHEN: Wednesday September 24 at 6:30 pm Networking followed by  Panel discussion at 7 pm.

WHERE: Barlow Productions at 1115 Olivette Executive Pkwy, St Louis, MO 63132   (314) 994-9990

From Olive and 170, head West to Olivette Executive Pkwy. Barlow Productions is on the Left and the parking lot is behind the building.

WHO: YOU WILL BE THERE!

WHO WILL SPEAK:
Dan Steadman started his Hollywood career in 2001 and worked on such shows as “That 70s Show” and “Whoopi,” writing for such companies as The Disney Channel, Comcast, and “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” He subsequently shot several pilots featuring such actors as Melissa McCarthy, Cheryl Hines, Kathy Griffin, Wanda Sykes, 2013 Emmy Winner Tony Hale, and Oscar winner Octavia Spencer. He is now focused on discovering new talent in different parts of the country and has written and directed 5 independent features in the last 3 years, the latest being “Belleville” and the upcoming Christmas film “Expect Delays.” More info at circa87.com

Vanessa Roman is a Webster U graduate with a degree in Film and English and has been producing, writing, acting and directing for 15 years.  Her films have shown around the country and garnered awards from the prestigious Female Eye Film Festival in Toronto and from our local St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. Currently, she is gearing up to go into production on a feature film that will be shot in St. Louis next year.

Srikant Chellappa is an accomplished Writer, Director, Producer in the US. His credits include GHOST IMAGE (20th Century Fox), Fatal Call (red box, 10+ countries), An American Candidate (netflix) and Most recently produced Brian Jun’s Untitled Drama which is in Post Production. He is currently working on developing a dark comedy as a writer, director and producer. He produced four feature films for budgets ranging from 130k to 700k. He studied Finance at University of Memphis and works at eMids Technologies and Kalinga Productions.

COST:
MCA Members — FREE
Non-members — $10
Students with Valid ID — $5

Whether your budget is large or small, good producing is all about getting what the film needs for less.

Join us and hear Dan, Vanessa, and Srikant share their experiences and methods for getting the most film quality for your budget.

Deadline Extended for St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards

The MCA extends the deadline to September 15!

Enter your Corporate Video/Media

in the

First Annual

St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards

TODAY!

 

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The deadline for entries is Monday, September 15, 2014; cost $25 per entry per category.

The 2014 St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards are sponsored by the MCA-I St. Louis Chapter. The awards ceremony will take place Wednesday, October 15, 2014, and will honor work completed during the past year.

There are 20 categories open to those who have produced corporate media during the past 12 months. Entries must have been completed after March 1, 2013, and must have been produced by or for a corporation or business or production house.

 

SEE ARTICLE BELOW FOR THE ENTRY FORM!

Script Mechanics presents CinemaSpoke Finalist Jasna Palada’s CLARA

Script Mechanics presents

CinemaSpoke Finalist’s Reading #2

Jasna Palada’s CLARA

A Dark Drama/Thriller

This Saturday, September 13, at 1pm at the Buder Library, Script Mechanics will hold a table read of CinemaSpoke Finalist Jasna Palada’s CLARA!

CLARA logline: An alcoholic mother decides to kidnap her child after losing custody, resulting in an ill hatched plan to cross the border into Mexico where the circumstances become much worse before she is able to finally redeem herself.

Congratulations to the Top 3 finalists in the 2014 CinemaSpoke screenplay competition! Continue reading Script Mechanics presents CinemaSpoke Finalist Jasna Palada’s CLARA

CinemaSpoke Finalist’s Reading #1 — Thomas LeRoy Fleming’s CAGED

The MCA and Script Mechanics

presents

CinemaSpoke Finalist’s Reading #1

Thomas LeRoy Fleming’s CAGED

This Saturday, August 30, at 1pm at the Buder Library, Script Mechanics will hold a table read of CinemaSpoke Finalist Thomas LeRoy Fleming’s CAGED, which is based on true events! Continue reading CinemaSpoke Finalist’s Reading #1 — Thomas LeRoy Fleming’s CAGED

St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards

St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards

First Annual St. Louis Corporate Media Awards

Call For Entries

The 2014 St. Louis MCA Diamond Reel Awards are sponsored by the MCA-I St. Louis Chapter. The awards ceremony will take place Wednesday, October 15, 2014, and will honor work completed during the past year.

There are 20 categories open to those who have produced corporate media during the past 12 months. Entries must have been completed after March 1, 2013, and must have been produced by or for a corporation or business or production house.

Label each entry with each Category, Title of Entry, Name(s) of those involved, and Running Time. We will not return any DVDs, jump drives, or media. Or load your entry into the MCA-I St. Louis Vimeo Channel: https://vimeo.com/home/page:1/filter:all/format:video.

The deadline for entries is Monday, September 1, 2014.

Personal Information:

Company: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Name of Person entering: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Street Address: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
City/State/Zip: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Phone: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Email: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Project Information:

Title: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Length: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Producer: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Director: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Videographer: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Lighting Director: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Writer: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Editor: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Audio: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Graphics: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Talent: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Production Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Completion Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Brief Description: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Categories:
(Check appropriate category.)

Corporate Awards:

[_] Best Corporate Campaign (Radio, TV, Print)
[_] Best Corporate Information Video
[_] Best Corporate Image Video
[_] Best Broadcast/Cable Spot (under :60 seconds)
[_] Best Cable Feature
[_] Best Infomercial
[_] Best On-line Spot
[_] Best Direction in a Corporate Video
[_] Best Camerawork in a Corporate Video
[_] Best Editing in a Corporate Video
[_] Best Graphics in a Corporate Video
[_] Best in Print
[_] Best in Photography
[_] Best Radio Spot
[_] Best PSA
[_] Best Web Design
[_] Best Web Video
[_] Best Writing in a Corporate Video
[_] Best Talent in a Corporate Video

Best of Show Award (picked from entries)

Entries can be submitted in person to Lou Stemmler or Peter Carlos of MCA-I, or mailed to:

MCA-I Louie Awards
Silver Streak Studios
413 Hanley Industrial Court
Saint. Louis, MO 63144-1511

The fee to enter is $25 per entry, payable to MCA-I.

Each entry received or postmarked after September 1 but received by September 12, 2014, is $35 per entry.

Each entry needs a separate entry form.

All judges’ decisions are final.

President’s June/July Message MCA-I St. Louis Chapter

cinemaspoke logo new3The CINEMASPOKE Screenplay Contest deadline has been extended until July 31, 2014. Here’s your chance to get your screenplay read and evaluated. Some of the prizes include filmmaking books (courtesy of Michael Wiese Productions), as well as published professional screenplays. Finalists in the contest will receive table reads of their entire screenplays, an opportunity to receive attention from Emmy-winning screenwriter-instructor, consideration for representation by talent agent Lloyd Robinson of Suite A Management, and if Robinson reps the writer, recommendation to several hundred producers. Winner receives critique and advice from Ken Rotcop of the Perfect Pitch®.
Designed to showcase local writers, the contest is sponsored by the monthly screenplay reading series Script Mechanics, in cooperation with the St. Louis chapter of the Media Communication Association (MCA), publisher Michael Wiese Productions, and other partners.
The winner will be announced at the MCA St. Louis’ Corporate Media Awards Presentation in October. The entry fee is $35. That’s a little for a lot. For information, visit the Facebook Page or the website.

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Everyone knows or should know that working on film and television shoots is not a 9 to 5 job. Sometimes the hours can be long and arduous. Like police work and firefighting, there are long periods of boredom and then those anxious moments where you have to hurry up and get it done. I’m not saying that film and tv is as important or more than what law enforcement or fire fighters do. We’re not saving lives, but we’re putting our lives, and others, in jeopardy when we work over thirteen, sixteen, sometimes twenty hours at a time, and have to drive home dead tired. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt and bumper sticker.
longmire-618x400-300x194On Saturday morning, June 28, 2014, crew member Gary Tuck, 48, from New Mexico, was driving home from a long shift on A&E’s Longmire TV show. At 4:30 am, his truck veered off the road and flipped. He died in the one-vehicle accident.
It’s possible he fell asleep at the wheel. An investigation is underway by the Teamsters union to find out the circumstances.
In the past, when I was just starting out in the business, I, too, worked long hours, sometimes up to eighteen and twenty hours at a time trying to make a day, get the shot right, and saving money by working a bit longer to avoid coming back the next day. I remember having to drive over thirty miles from a wrap day to get home. But I didn’t remember most of the drive. I’ve been on both sides of the camera, crew member and producer. I understand how things work. Now I refuse to do over ten hours on a shoot. I know that’s not the norm, but it has to change.
We’re making movies and television, folks, not performing brain surgery or fighting fires or chasing bad guys through mean streets. Nothing is worth having to go to someone you know or have worked with and tell them that their sons and daughters, husbands and wives, fathers and mothers died because they worked too long on a set. That’s crazy.

To quote Sgt. Phil Esterhaus from Hill Street Blues, “Let’s be careful out there.”

In-Sync in St. Louis